Cruisers Ticonderoga Class

Overview

Country: United States

During the Second World War the United States Navy had suffered at the hands of Japanese kamikazes in the Pacific and with German guided-missile attacks in European seas. In the 1950s and 1960s they sort to counter the aerial threat with a continuation of the layered air defence and improved plotting methods. However the missile systems, appropriate for small numbers of Soviet manned aircraft or missiles, were seen to be inadequate for the expanding Soviet anti-ship missile threat developing in the 1960s.
At first the US Navy developed the Typhoon air defence system but when that was cancelled they established a programme known as the Advanced Surface Missile System (ASMS) in 1964. By the end of the decade this had been re-named the Aegis programme. The component parts were the AN/SPY-1 radar and the improved Standard Missile-2.
The Navy commissioned the first Aegis cruiser, USS Ticonderoga (CG 47), Jan. 22, 1983, and its introduction into service changed the shape of naval warfare. These modern US Navy cruisers are highly capable and can operate in a high threat area either as a part of Amphibious Assault Groups, Battle Force or as part of a Carrier Battle Group.
The Ticonderoga Class cruisers have been continually upgraded and enhancements have been made since 1983. Today many years after the Cold War ended the vessels still on the active list are some of the most effective units in the United States Navy.
USS Ticonderoga was deployed to the Lebanese coast in 1983 following the terrorist attack on the US Marine barracks. Later ships of this class were sent to the Arabian Gulf to protect American and allied nation’s tankers during the Iraq-Iran War. During one such deployment the USS Vincennes became notorious after she mistakenly shot down a civilian airliner killing all on board.
Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990 brought Aegis cruisers into a key part of the coalition’s naval operations. During OPERATION DESERT STORM Ticonderoga-class cruisers fired a number of Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles (TLAM).

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